Carbon sequestration: It’s easier than the word sounds!

‘Sequestration’ is that even a real word?

I remember making conscious effort to ignore the whole idea of ‘Carbon Sequestration’ because I assumed it was such a big scientific phenomenon and I did not have the expertise to understand the whole idea. Plus who dislikes big words as much as I do? In my opinion, there is always a simpler way to express everything while keeping the meaning.

See, all the talk about carbon, I have always wondered why we cannot just plant enough trees to suck it all up and everyone is happy. Unfortunately, our forests are long degraded and we produce way too much carbon for the trees to keep up.

As you know the aim here is to simplify ideas like Carbon Sequestration which is the process of storing carbon away for the long term. It has been argued that we cannot completely cease the use of fossil fuels in the next 50 years. (I always argue the need to focus on a sustainable energy mix instead). This is the reason why we need to get rid of the more carbon than is being produced.

co2

How then do we store it away?

Carbon Sequestration can be achieved either through biological processes such as peat production, urban forestry, reforestation, sea weed growth, Urea and Iron fertilisation (All of which are related to the natural process of plant species absorbing atmospheric carbon) or physical processes such as ‘Bio energy with carbon capture and storage’ (BECCS), storing it at ocean bottom (where the pressure is high enough for CO2 to exist in liquid form) or Geological sequestration (which is simply storing carbon in faults, anticlines and other geological structures).

Though each of these processes have their benefits and challenges, I cannot possibly cover all of it in this blog post, but what we need to know is that, not only is reducing carbon emission important, storing away for a long term is equally important process that needs to be practiced especially by industry and high polluters since a complete carbon free energy mix isn’t yet a reality. 

We work, and we remain hopeful.

 

 

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One Comment Add yours

  1. Adedeji says:

    Quite informative. From your explanation, it relates so much to the CarbFix project in Iceland. It would be nice if you could simplify the technicalities of that project. Is it sustainable? Thanks

    Like

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